Nigeria

Nigeria

Refugee influx Emergency Food Security Assessment (EFSA) and Market Assessment in Benue, Cross Rivers and Taraba States, Nigeria (November, 2018)

Post date Sunday, 14 April, 2019 - 15:04
Document Type Assessment Report, Situation Report
Content Themes Accountability to Affected Populations, Protection, Emergency Response, Nutrition, Markets, Livelihoods, Food Security
Sources United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), WFP

In order to assess the food security situation and livelihood opportunities available to refugee households as well as the level of functionality of markets, an EFSA and Market assessment was undertaken in Cross Rivers, Benue and Taraba states between 22 September and 01 October 2018. The assessment informs the response to the Cameroon Refugees influx in South-south Nigeria. The exercise covered over 1300 households across 25 communities in eight Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the three most affected states. A three-stratum approach was applied for the selection of households; Refugees in settlements (camps), Refugees living in host communities and Host community members. The data collection was supported by the National Bureau of Statistics State Office in Cross Rivers state, Caritas Nigeria, JDPC/Caritas and UNHCR. The key findings of the assessment include:
- On average, half of refugee households surveyed were headed by women and the average age of household heads among refugee groups ranged between 36 to 40 years.
- Refugee communities are largely dependent on assistance, begging and occasional daily unskilled wage labour opportunities when compared to host community members who are more dependent on agriculture as a means of livelihood.
- Refugees in host communities are more likely to have better access to wage labour opportunities than refugees in the settlements. Insufficient job opportunities was the most commonly reported livelihood constraint across refugee populations.
- Refugees in general are likely to have poor dietary diversity compared to host communities. Over 40 percent of refugee households living in host community and 28 percent of refugees in settlements had poor diet. Households with poor food consumption relied on cereal or tubers, vegetables and oil as staple diets a week prior to the assessment. The findings also indicated that the earlier the refugees households arrived the likely they are to have poor dietary diversity.
- Majority of refugee households applied food consumption-based coping strategies. The use of coping strategies within these households indicates food shortages, inducing households to reduce food portion size and rely on less expensive food, which were assessed as the most commonly used coping strategies applied by refugee communities.
- The market availability of the most important food commodities in the staple diet of refugees which consists of garri, rice, yam and beans were generally; very low-to-low availability for rice and beans, medium to high for garri and yam for retailers.  While NFIs availability differed from low to medium in Cross Rivers State, very high in Benue State and high to very high in Taraba State.
- The Minimum Expenditure Basket calculation for a family or household of averagely 6 persons was N35,045 in Akamkpa, N37,947 in Boki, N30,330 in Etung, N31,679 in Ikom, N39,386 in Kwande, N36,339 in Obanliku, N30,434 in Ogoja and N33,261 in Sardauna LGAs across the three states.
- Markets in the three states were competitive and well stocked with sufficient supplies of local staples, which affords traders the capacity to absorb any additional increase in demand, which favours the implementation of cash based interventions.

 

 

Download refugee_influx_emergency_food_security_assessment_efsa_and_market_assessment_in_benue_cross_rivers_and_taraba_states_nigeria_november_2018.pdf
PDF - 2.63 MB