Nigeria

Nigeria

FEWSNET FOOD SECURITY OUTLOOK - AUGUST 2018

Post date Monday, 3 September, 2018 - 12:36
Document Type Humanitarian Needs Overview
Content Themes Resilience, Emergency Response, Resource Mobilization, Agriculture, Early Recovery, Early Warning, Food Assistance, Food Security
Sources Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWSNET)

KEY MESSAGES

  • Households worst affected by conflict in parts of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states continue to depend on humanitarian assistance and are facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3!), while populations in hard to reach areas with limited livelihood activities and poorly functioning markets are facing Emergency (IPC Phase 4). Others have restricted access to food and are reliant on high levels of coping as they remain in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).
  • Military operation “Last Hold” targeting the Boko Haram insurgents continues in the northeast with substantial population movements registered in the area. During the first week of August over 6,400 population movements were recorded in Borno and Adamawa states based on IOM Emergency Tracking Matrix. Food security outcomes in areas of the northeast that remain inaccessible are likely similar or worse than in adjoining accessible areas already experiencing severe outcomes.
  • Across much of the rest of Nigeria, household and market food stocks continue to deplete normally during the peak of the lean season. Most poor households are accessing food through market purchase, early green harvests, wild foods and agricultural and non-agricultural labor. Staple food prices are lower than last year but remain above average. Much of the country outside of the northeast remains in Minimal (IPC Phase 1).
  • The growing season is evolving favorably with normal crop growth and development in most areas across the country. Early green harvest of yam, maize, groundnut and potatoes is underway depending on the area. Staple prices remain elevated during the peak of the lean season, particularly in northeastern markets due to the insurgency.
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